Executive Board

Current Officers

 President: Fnot Gebremicael

Fnot is a  student in the Graduate Program in International Affairs, concentrating in Conflict and Security, with a special focus on the Horn of Africa. She studied conflict-resolution and peace-building at Georgetown University, where she earned a B.A in Government and African Studies. She has experience working for Rep. Lynn Woolsey – CA (D), with the Global Fund for Children, Devex, the Permanent Mission of Eritrea to the United Nations, and the Parliamentary Monitoring Group in Cape Town, South Africa. Fnot served on the executive board for the African Society of Georgetown for four years, and is a proud member of DAWN (Diaspora Africa Women’s Network). 

 
Director of Programming: Benjamin Ace

headshot_projAfrica

Ben graduated from California University of Pennsylvania in 2008 with a degree in Computer Engineering then moved to Seattle and worked as an support engineer for Comcast for two years. He always had a fascination with the Africa continent and aspired to live there so applied to the Peace Corps. He served a 3 year tour in Cameroon, where he taught Computer Science for two years at a high school and then for one year at a technical training college. His Peace Corps experience made him realize how much he enjoyed working with people rather than machines. Ben is in the International Affairs graduate program, with a concentration in Conflict and Security and Governance and Rights. He is interested in issues surrounding human rights, immigrant and refugee populations and the convergence of technology and human rights.

Community Outreach Director: Michael Aryee

Mike Head Shot

Born in Ghana, Michael moved to the small town of Leominster, Massachusetts at the age of 9.  He attended Leominster High School and earned a Bachelor’s of Arts at Trinity College in Connecticut.  While at Trinity, he self-designed a major in Philosophy, Politics and Economics and was engaged in various community service projects.  His principal interest is in human rights advocacy, which he pursued as president of the Trinity College chapter of Amnesty International, and later as the head of the Save Darfur Coalition at the American University of Paris, during a year abroad.  Currently pursuing a Master’s of International Affairs at The New School, he remains committed to tackling contemporary social issues with a renewed interest in Africa as a whole.  As the Project Africa Community Outreach Officer, Michael welcomes the opportunity to advance the group’s objective and present an alternative narrative to the often academic and paternalistic treatment of the region.

Social Media Chair: Samantha Clements

Samantha is a GPIA student. New to the city she graduated Cum Laude from Susquehanna University with a history/political science degree with a minor in diversity studies in May 2012. She entered the Milano School to pursue the Cities and Social Justice concentration. Currently Samantha is interested in the themes of gender and development, urbanization and creation of infrastructure, and genocide/holocaust studies. Since moving to New York she has also begun to pursue social justice through her church and is looking forward to see where that will take her and the congregation. 

Faculty Advisor: Antina von Schnitzler

Antina_VonSchnitzler

Antina von Schnitzler is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate Program of International Affairs and an affiliate faculty member in the Department of Anthropology. She received her PhD in Anthropology from Columbia University in 2010. Before joining the New School she was a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Anthropology Department at Reed College. Her research and teaching has focused on citizenship and political subjectivities, the anthropology of infrastructure and technology, liberalism and neoliberalism, colonialism and postcoloniality, and South Africa. She is currently working on a book manuscript based on ethnographic and archival research in Johannesburg and Soweto, tentatively entitledDemocracy’s Infrastructure: Citizenship, Technology and the Materiality of Politics in South Africa.

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